EXERCISING CRIMINAL JURISDICTION in California Tribal Courts Conference

Join us for a one-day conference devoted to the “nuts and bolts” needed for California tribal courts to exercise criminal jurisdiction over Indians and non-Indian offenders who commit domestic violence on tribal lands.

Presenters will be from out-of-state tribes comparable in population and size to many California tribes that currently exercise criminal jurisdiction.  The agenda will include presentations from tribal court judges, tribal prosecutors, tribal defense attorneys, court clerks, tribal law enforcement and correction officers.

Who Should Attend:  Tribal leaders, tribal court judges, court personnel, tribal law enforcement, tribal attorneys, domestic violence advocates and resource providers, and tribal community members.

This conference is CLE eligible for 6.75 hours.

THURSDAY, MAY 11, 2017

9:00 AM to 5:00 PM

Space is limited. Registration required by 5/3/17 to: tedmiston@calindian.org or call (760) 746-8941 x107. Breakfast and lunch are being provided.

Hosted by CILS with a grant from Bureau of Indian Affairs- Tribal Justice Support, Office of Justice Services.

Held at:
Rincon Casino and Resort, 777 South Resort Drive, Valley Center, CA 92082

Register here.

View event agenda here.

 

http://www.calindian.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/2017tribalcourtsagenda.pdf

 

Free Technical Assistance to Tribes on Conducting Criminal Background Checks

CILS is pleased to announce that it is now offering free technical assistance to tribes interested in or conducting criminal background checks on prospective families who want to become a tribally licensed home for tribal member children being placed outside their home by County Protective Services (CPS). CILS can provide information and guidance on:

 Completing the California Department of Justice (DOJ) forms to access Criminal Offender Record Information;
 Conducting Child Abuse Central Index checks;
 Accessing list of “non-exemptible” crimes that require denying an application for placement;
 When and how a tribe may exempt crimes that are not “non-exemptible”;
 Provide a sample resolution to submit with the tribe’s DOJ applications;
 Sample Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), the tribe, may consider in working with its local CPS;
 Policies the tribe should consider in operating its criminal background check program.

Please submit your questions to TribalCriminalBackgroundcheck@calindian.org.

This service is being provided through funding from the California Department of Social Services.

Blue Shield of California Foundation Expands Grants to Prevent Domestic Violence

Thank you, Blue Shield of California Foundation, for your support!
Nine community-centered groups get aid to support the most vulnerable Californians and CILS is one of them.

Read more here.

AB-233 CA Education Code Amendment: Right to Wear Religious, Ceremonial, or Cultural Adornments at School Graduation Ceremonies

On March 15, 2017, the Assembly Education Committee held a hearing and passed AB-233, that was introduced by Assemblymember Todd Gloria, (D-San Diego). Under AB-233 the California Education Code would be amended to prohibit schools from denying students the right to wear traditional, cultural, or religious adornment on their cap and gown during graduation. The need for this amendment comes after numerous contacts received by CILS each graduation season from Native American students and their families reporting that their local school is denying the student the right to wear an eagle feather on their graduation cap, beaded adornment on their gown or a tribal traditional sash. Testifying before the Committee on the importance and need for AB-233 was CILS Executive Director, Dorothy Alther, the Honorable Chairman from the Rincon Band of Luiseno Mission Indians, Bo Mazzetti and Ms. Rebekah Israel, a member of the Lone Pine Paiute-Shoshone Tribe who graduated in 2016 and had her eagle feather removed from her graduation cap.

The California School Board Association (CSBA) filed a letter opposing the bill and testified against AB-233 contending, among other things, that the amendment was unnecessary because current law and local school district already ensure students the right to wear items of religious significance at their graduation, such as an eagle feather. As pointed out by the testimony of both Ms. Alther and Ms. Israel, this is not the case, and there is a lack of consistency among school districts on this issue. AB-233 will bring a uniform, standard and practice to all schools ensuring no student is denied their right to freedom of expression at their graduation.

Watch the Assembly Education Committee meeting here and bypass watching the entire three-hour meeting by scrolling down the list and clicking on AB-233.

AB-233 will now move to the Assembly Judiciary Committee for review and hearing.

CILS will like to thank all of the tribes that submitted letters of support and/or had their representatives at the hearing to voice their support directly before the Committee.

Read more on this story here.